Contribution of the psychosocial work environment to psychological distress among health care professionals before and during a major organizational change

Melanie Lavoie-Tremblay, Jean-Pierre Bonin, Alain D Lesage, Arielle Bonneville-Roussy, Geneviève L Lavigne, Dominique Laroche

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between 4 dimensions of the psychosocial work environment (psychological demands, decision latitude, social support, and effort-reward) among health care professionals as well as their psychological distress during a reorganization process. A correlational descriptive design was used for this quantitative study. A total of 159 health care professionals completed the questionnaire at T1, and 141 at T2. First, before the work reorganization, effort-reward imbalance was the sole variable of the psychological work environment that significantly predicted psychological distress. Second, the high overall level of psychological distress increased during the process of organizational change (from T1 to T2). Finally, effort-reward imbalance, high psychological demands, and low decision latitude were all significant predictors of psychological distress at T2, during the organizational change. In conclusion, to reduce the expected negative outcomes of restructuring on health care practitioners, managers could increase the number of opportunities for rewards, carefully explain the demands, and clarify the tasks to be performed by each of the employees to reduce their psychological burden and increase their perceptions of autonomy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)293-304
Number of pages12
JournalThe health care manager
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Nov 2010

Keywords

  • Female
  • Health Personnel
  • Hospital Administration
  • Humans
  • Job Satisfaction
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Organizational Innovation
  • Quebec
  • Regression Analysis
  • Risk Factors
  • Social Support
  • Socioeconomic Factors
  • Stress, Psychological
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Workplace

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