Decolonising inclusive education: an example from a research in Colombia

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Abstract

Inclusive education is a concept born in the global North. Research has shown that its relatively recent but widespread adoption by countries in the global South is often done without consideration of the actual needs of these contexts and by solely focusing on strategies for learners with disabilities. As a result, inclusive education has been criticised as a neo-colonial project in need for renovation. The aim of this article is to show how research can broaden the understanding of inclusive education and make it more relevant to southern contexts. Drawing on an ethnographic research on inclusive education in Colombia, I present some unique examples of vulnerability, but also experiences of belonging in the direst of circumstances. I conclude that in order to decolonise the concept of inclusive education and make its practice sustainable in southern contexts, we need more culturally sensitive research to inform our understanding of those under-researched spaces.


Original languageEnglish
Number of pages30
JournalDisability and the Global South
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2020

Keywords

  • inclusive education
  • decolonising methodologies
  • Critical Disability Studies
  • Colombia
  • Global South

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