Leadership succession as an aspect of organizational sustainability in complementary schools in England

Anthony Thorpe, Linet Arthur, Ana Souza

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Abstract

The article explores leadership succession as an aspect of organizational sustainability in complementary schools in England as an example of how schools in precarious circumstances seek to ensure their survival and growth. The schools provide part time education outside of mainstream, state-funded school systems in many countries. Often established by migrant and minority ethnic groups to teach language, culture, religion and/or to consolidate state school learning, a lack of resources can threaten their stability and development. Using concepts from organizational sustainability and leadership succession planning, we analyse data collected from seven Brazilian and Chinese complementary school leaders in England. Our focus on the little researched context of complementary schools adds to the understanding of leading and managing in distinctive and challenging circumstances. Their inclusion in the debates and research can foster different insights into the ways that schools in diverse and challenging contexts seek to ensure their survival and growth.

© 2018, The Author(s), published by Australian Council for Educational Leaders. This is an author produced version of a paper published in LEADING & MANAGING uploaded in accordance with the publisher’s self- archiving policy. The final published version (version of record) is available online at the link below. Some minor differences between this version and the final published version may remain. We suggest you refer to the final published version should you wish to cite from it.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)61-73
Number of pages13
JournalLeading & Managing
Volume24
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2018

Keywords

  • complementary schools, supplementary schools, organizational sustainability, leadership succession, headteachers, senior leaders

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